0:23

Good afternoon, it's not 2 p.m. Just yet. So I'm going to hold on a moment

0:32

Because I suspect that we're going to get some more people coming in

0:36

Can someone just indicate to me that they can actually hear me?

0:41

Thank You Martin

0:44

All right, it is now 2 p.m

0:52

So I need to let you know that I am recording this session

0:57

If anyone has an issue with that, please do let me know

1:01

Students usually find it helpful though, because sometimes people can't attend the session

1:06

Sometimes people want to revisit the session, etc. So

1:11

Okay

1:12

Welcome to the B4 module. My name is Ian Jennings

1:17

the module as I'm sure you know is called politics and society for the life sciences and

1:23

Most of you will already have had a coaching session

1:27

so

1:28

What I'm going to say today may be somewhat repetitive

1:33

because my intention is simply to

1:35

Let you know how the course is going to work and deal with any questions that you might have about that

1:40

In fact, if you made it to one of my own coaching sessions at the FI&V

1:46

During the week, you're very unlikely to hear anything new this afternoon, but welcome anyway

1:53

If you're at the ZHRV, I'm sure that the coaches there gave you a lot of the information you need

1:59

I have a lot of faith in them, but it might be that

2:04

that there are some things that you'll want to ask me about so

2:08

Okay

2:10

Welcome. Before I start with the details

2:15

Are there any questions that you want to ask straight up?

2:23

No, it's always a little bit intimidating doing this online thing

2:28

But you guys are master students, so I presume you've had some experience of this

2:35

Hello, good afternoon

2:39

Just only

2:41

to know

2:43

Which members are from the groups? I think

2:48

That is my only question because I want to know for this Tuesday

2:53

Deyanira, I responded to your mail about 10 minutes ago

2:57

I will simply put up a list and send it to everyone who's who's being coached by me

3:05

Obviously, I don't know who I don't know which coaches have which students at the ZHRV

3:12

That's something that the coaches will know. So if you're from the ZHRV and you want to know which

3:18

presentation group you're in

3:20

Then you need to talk to your coach

3:23

All right

3:25

Any further questions?

3:31

Okay, so

3:33

I'm not going to say too much about the

3:37

decentralized classes now

3:39

And that's because you should have heard most of it anyway

3:44

but obviously I am open to questions, but let me just say that the

3:49

Decentralized classes make up 30% of the final mark

3:53

And that ends up being 10% for each presentation that you do

3:58

So that should give you some indication of how important the presentations are

4:04

So they are important, but they're not as important as the exam, which is going to happen in June about

4:10

two months from now

4:12

so I

4:13

suspect you probably need me to talk more about that because that falls under the heading of the centralized classes and

4:22

That is something that your coaches at the ZHRV will not have told you very much about, I don't think

4:28

All right, if you go to the course Moodle page, well, there are a couple of things I need to tell you about it

4:35

the first one is that the course has mutated from being a

4:40

Classroom course to being an online course and that has changed quite a lot about it

4:45

In fact, the the directors have asked me to make it asynchronous

4:49

In other words, there isn't there isn't a certain thing that gets taught in any given week

4:55

Despite what you will see on the course Moodle page

4:58

I confess I really need to change that and I will but I haven't done so yet so you can still see it

5:04

So on the Moodle page you can see

5:07

Course week one, course week two, course week three, etc with the readings for those weeks

5:13

Well, it's not going to work exactly like that

5:16

The readings are there to help you prepare your long question for the exam

5:22

so please

5:23

Please do not think that you have to read all of those things and nor should you think that you have to read them in specific

5:30

weeks

5:32

What's going to happen is that the exam in June is divided into two sections

5:38

one of them is

5:40

The so-called long question. That's also something that's changed

5:45

in this course

5:47

And that's because of the rise of ChatGPT

5:52

I used to give students take-home essays

5:54

But I've been asked by the directors to not do that anymore and to rather include them as being part of the exam

6:01

Now that has both

6:04

Well, I guess it does sound a bit scary, but it shouldn't be for reasons that I'll explain to you

6:09

So the first point to make is your exam counts 70% of the final mark

6:15

And half of that in other words 35%

6:19

Is allocated to the long question that you will answer in the exam

6:23

so about half of the running time of the exam should be committed to writing an answer to this long question and

6:32

the readings on the course Moodle page are only of

6:36

Use to you if they work for the particular essay that you want to write

6:41

So I'm just going to share the course Moodle page with you now

6:46

Let me see if I always find this somewhat difficult to do, but I seem to have got it right. Yeah

6:52

All right

6:54

Okay, I'm scrolling down to the section. Oh, hang on. Sorry. I'm going in the wrong direction

7:03

Assessment and examinations

7:05

I'm now clicking on the link in the section called assessment and examinations

7:10

You can see the heading there and scrolling down. There is a link called long questions part of the exam in June

7:18

2024

7:20

now the thing is you get to see the questions before the exam you get to see them right now and

7:27

You can start preparing them. Now. You will not be allowed to take notes into the exam

7:34

You will have to write it with a pen

7:37

and

7:38

on paper so

7:41

There it's not going to be possible for you to make extensive notes and then simply write them out in the exam

7:47

In other words, you're gonna have to have a certain amount in your head before you start

7:53

Okay, that's the bad news

7:55

the good news is that we have two months to work on that and

7:59

much of the

8:01

Centralized part of the course will be you working on this long question

8:06

That means

8:07

You can get in touch with me as often as you need to to discuss whether your long question preparation is going the way that

8:14

It should

8:16

The one thing that I won't do is I won't write written

8:20

comments on texts that you send me in other words, you can't write a

8:26

Answer and then send it to me and say is this okay?

8:30

But I will do verbal comments on them in other words if you show them to me

8:35

I will say something about them and I'll do that as much as you need me to do. So let me emphasize

8:41

you are going to be left on your own to some extent in preparing this long question, but

8:46

You are welcome to consult me as much as you need to

8:49

People generally do I generally find it interesting. So you do not need to be shy about doing that

8:56

So you need to look at these five questions here

8:59

Decide which of them you want to answer in the exam and start thinking about how you're going to do that right now

9:06

I remember you're not going to have a lot of time. So your answer is going to have to be quite short

9:11

So that means you need to think about it quite carefully

9:15

and

9:16

Depending on which answer you try to go for

9:20

There will be different research strategies and I'll talk you through these five assets. I

9:27

Also want to make the point that if you have some subject that you are really passionate about and want to write an essay about

9:35

I am open to considering

9:37

That an extra will a special long question for you

9:42

But you do need to contact me about that because although I frequently say yes

9:47

I do also sometimes say no. In other words, it must be a question. That is of the

9:53

Required level and it must be one that really does have to do with politics and the life sciences

10:00

But people have done this in the past and

10:04

I've had some very interesting responses as a result. So don't feel that you can't do that. However, um

10:14

the vast majority of people

10:15

Yes, sure an example for such a question could be if

10:20

Vaccinations should be mandatory or not. For example. Yeah. Yeah, that would be an interesting

10:25

Well, I mean that's falls very obviously into the category of politics and the life sciences

10:30

So yeah, I would be happy if you want to write that though. It's Marco

10:36

I see or if anyone else wants to write on that

10:39

Please do just contact me first and warn me that you want to write on that

10:45

Perfect. Thank you. It won't be there on the exam paper

10:49

But that does not mean you can't write it if you've spoken to me about it beforehand

10:53

Until when would we have to contact you about just before the exam?

10:57

So, you know, you'd have two months to do so, but but if you perfect if you want to start working on it

11:03

Then it'd probably be wiser to contact me a little earlier

11:08

If you want to talk to me about it in other words

11:13

Okay, so what I'm going to do now is just talk you through these five topics here so that you can get some sort of

11:18

sense of which one seems interesting to you

11:21

And where you might find some help in getting

11:25

Getting some research material now. Now I want to emphasize I realize this is a natural sciences master's degree

11:32

I'm not expecting something like a politics master student would write. It's not anything like a bachelor's thesis

11:39

It's just a short answer in an exam

11:42

so

11:43

And it's certainly not a test of your English skills

11:47

If I can understand your English, that's good enough. It doesn't have to be anything near perfect

11:52

I'm also well aware that for most of you English is not your mother tongue

11:58

Okay, but I will give you some indications about what a good essay looks like and what a not good essay looks like

12:05

there are some helpful tips I can give you but

12:08

As I say

12:10

Don't I know this sounds somewhat stressful, but I do want to reassure you

12:14

It's not as bad as it sounds but once you start working on it, you'll realize that

12:18

Finding material isn't going to be a problem

12:20

Your problem is more going to be how can I compress it down to the to something short enough to fit into an exam answer?

12:28

And that is you know, that can be a problem. And if you want to talk to me about that, then that's also good

12:34

All right

12:35

So to the topics the first and the fourth one

12:39

Are similar in that they both require you to look very closely at one text

12:46

That doesn't mean you can't look at any other text

12:49

But really number one and number four are responses to a particular text

12:55

in both cases, I will be

12:58

Expecting you to either tell me why you think this text is basically correct or why you think that

13:06

You disagree with the opinion expressed in the text and obviously you can fall somewhere between the two as well

13:12

But I want to see evidence that you've thought seriously about the text

13:17

The first one

13:19

Evaluate Eric Posner's case against human rights. You can see the link right here

13:26

It's from the British newspaper The Guardian

13:29

It's quite a long article. In other words, it's not a standard newspaper length article. It's longer than that

13:35

But it's not super long and it's not an academic article. So it's journalism, but it's high standard journalism

13:42

Eric Posner was a person who worked in human rights internationally for many years and

13:51

He came to the conclusion that he still shared all of the goals that had motivated him

13:57

to campaign for human rights, but he came to the conclusion that

14:03

Using the phrase human rights

14:07

or

14:08

foregrounding the concept of human rights

14:11

Had negative as well as positive consequences or in some cases didn't have the kind of consequences that people hoped that it had

14:19

So he his response to that. Well, he went quite far. This is one of the reasons why I've

14:26

Suggested people write on this because it is quite controversial

14:29

You may you may find yourself quite irritated by this article

14:32

And if you are irritated by it, that's a good opportunity to write something about it because then you can explain to me

14:38

Why you disagree?

14:40

Okay, so he came to the conclusion that it might be better not to talk about human rights anymore to take a different approach to

14:47

Achieving pretty much the same goals that people who are serious about human rights feel ought to be reached

14:54

So this isn't the person who now thinks that people don't have rights and that you know, none of this matters anymore

14:59

That's not what's going on there. Rather. He thinks

15:03

Framing things through the concept of human rights is not as helpful as it once was

15:09

So I'd like to hear from you

15:12

If you choose this article

15:15

Is this an interesting and an intelligent point or is he just throwing up his hands in despair or?

15:21

Is he badly misguided any one of those takes if you can back it up that would be good

15:28

you'll also notice that

15:30

There are comments below the article on the Guardian's web page now

15:35

You guys are really the generation that grew up with social media and commenting on things online. So you'll be aware that

15:44

95% of what people write online is not worth reading but this is not the case

15:49

Here

15:50

There are some genuinely thoughtful responses to it. I'm not saying all of the comments are good. You'll pick that up quickly

15:57

There are a lot of people who just vent and you don't have anything interesting to say

16:02

But you will find some interesting comments underneath it as well

16:05

You don't need to read them. I won't penalize you if you don't

16:09

But you might find some helpful comments there. Some people might

16:13

Might be able to articulate something that you were thinking vaguely and they say it a bit clearer that that could be helpful

16:20

and then number four is

16:23

Not a journalist's article. It's a page

16:29

Taken out of a text which I have put on the course Moodle page

16:33

The text is in the course week two section

16:37

and

16:38

David Runciman is a British political scientist. In other words, I think he's a lecturer at the University of Oxford at any rate

16:46

He's a highly regarded

16:50

Person who studies politics

16:52

He claims on

16:55

page 215 in this text that

16:58

Mark Zuckerberg is a greater danger to democracy than Donald Trump is

17:03

And I don't think you should take

17:06

the name Mark Zuckerberg

17:08

Well, I don't think you should take it that he means only Mark Zuckerberg

17:11

I think he means social media in general so you could include Elon Musk there or even Jeff Bezos

17:19

Tim Cook

17:21

The alphabet people in general

17:25

He thinks that

17:27

Roughly put Donald Trump is a symptom

17:30

Mark

17:32

Social media is a deeper cause

17:34

And he even thinks there are other

17:37

Reasons there are other things that threaten democracy, too

17:40

But the main point that interests me here is is social media a greater danger to democracy than Donald Trump?

17:48

obviously that is

17:49

Controversial as well. Of course many people do think that but other people think that that is a

17:55

hysterical overreaction and that social media has

17:58

Very much a positive side as well as a negative side and that Donald Trump

18:04

Well, many people think he doesn't have a positive side at all, so

18:08

It's a controversial take and you might be interested in looking at that

18:12

Section of the book thoroughly. It's not very long

18:16

and

18:17

Telling me what your response to it is

18:22

questions two and three are

18:25

Are vaguer and broader you've got a bit more scope there. Well, perhaps I should say a lot more scope

18:32

You don't need to focus on a particular text you will find on the course Moodle played page

18:39

quite a few articles about democracy and

18:43

About populism, which is one of the things that people think threatens democracy

18:48

The globalization essay in the section that used to belong to course week seven in other words

18:55

Sorry, it still needs to be found there, but we don't we don't divide the course up into weeks anymore

19:00

Course week seven on the on the course Moodle page. There are quite a few articles about globalization

19:07

But let me stress that I've tended to put very basic articles on the Moodle page

19:13

Sort of like you might find in an encyclopedia of politics

19:18

Giving a basic explanation of what these concepts mean if you want to write something interesting

19:23

You might well want to do your own research to some extent

19:28

or

19:29

as in the case of number two

19:32

If you come from a country where and you feel that democracy in your country is particularly threatened

19:39

Perhaps in a way that it's not threatened elsewhere

19:43

That might be a good thing to write about as well. People have people did that last semester

19:48

I had some people from India

19:51

And you may know that there's certain amount of controversy about the rule of the Indian the ruling party at the moment

19:58

Some people feel that is a threat to democracy others feel that that's exaggerated

20:03

I had students who had both of those points of view and they both wrote interesting things on that topic

20:09

There are many parts of Europe too where people feel that democracy democracy is threatened

20:15

You might come from a place where?

20:17

Where people have that feeling you might want to write about it as well

20:22

Latin America there are some places where people worry about this the United States of course

20:28

But also if you want to write about a country that isn't yours

20:32

That's also fine. If you have a particular interest in another country by all means

20:37

And I'll explain once I've gone through these topics

20:41

Where you can find guidance on what a good answer would look like and what a bad answer would look like

20:48

With regard to the globalization question number three, it's quite a it was quite a popular question last semester

20:55

But beware

20:59

On at the bottom of the class Moodle page under the heading course week seven

21:05

You'll notice that the readings show you that there are many many aspects to globalization

21:10

for example cultural or economic

21:14

or political or

21:16

environmental

21:17

And it's not really advisable to try and cover all of that in one answer

21:24

It's perfectly respectable for you to say I'm only going to be talking about environment the environmental aspects of

21:31

Globalization because I don't have space to talk about the rest

21:35

There's nothing wrong with stating something like that. In fact, I would say it's probably wiser to stick to one aspect of globalization

21:42

Because it's a very very big topic. I

21:45

Purposefully made the question rather vague though. Does it make the world a better place?

21:50

Well, it's not completely vague I mean there there is a controversy about that

21:55

there there have been

21:58

anti-globalization movements and

22:00

There are also many people who feel that globalization has indeed made the world a better more prosperous healthier

22:08

place so there's a good case for both points of view and

22:13

This is one where I would say if you want to sit on the fence and say well

22:18

There are good and bad aspects. That's fine, too

22:21

What I don't like though is if it's just a lame

22:24

I don't want to go too deeply into this everything's pretty much the same

22:29

So don't don't be lame about it if you think that

22:33

That there are good and bad sides to it

22:35

tell me what the good sides are and what the bad sides are and whether you can

22:39

Whether we can hope that we'll only get the good sides or if we get the good sides

22:43

Do we have to take the bad as well? You know something like that

22:46

Just give me an intelligent or interesting take on globalization

22:50

The fifth one this is one that fewer people take

22:57

But I've got some pretty interesting responses to it. I think well judging from my finv students

23:05

I'm guessing a

23:07

Number of you will have seen the Monty Python movie the life of Brian

23:12

In fact, it's almost 50 years old, so we're not talking about contemporary culture

23:17

But it really has stuck people do still seem to find it funny

23:22

And I remember when I first watched it. I remember thinking

23:26

This is a movie made by people who are deeply committed to the liberal democratic point of view

23:32

And they're making fun of people who disagree with the level liberal democratic point of view and they're also in a rather clever way

23:40

Drawing attention to potential problems with liberal democracy

23:44

Now I thought this a long time ago, and I've always kind of thought well one day

23:49

I should write an article about it because no one else seems to be saying this

23:53

and

23:54

I just haven't got around to it. So maybe you can inspire me to do so

23:58

Well, maybe you can write a good essay that I can just plagiarize and claim that it was chat GPT

24:03

Anyway, if you want to write that

24:06

On that that would also be a lot of fun for me to mark

24:11

Getting hold of the movie isn't difficult. But if you do have problems and you want to write on it, just let me know

24:17

Even if you don't want to write on it

24:19

I would still recommend watching the movie because it is very very funny. Of course, many people also find it offensive

24:26

and I think it's intended to be offensive because it's intended to be offensive to

24:31

People who don't share the political viewpoint of the of those who make that who made the movie so again

24:37

Controversy and that makes for more interesting

24:41

Essay writing a long question

24:43

writing

24:45

Okay. So now I want to just tell you a little bit about

24:49

What makes an essay good and what makes an essay bad? I

24:54

put a

24:55

Okay in the in the the same heading

24:59

Assessment and examinations

25:02

There is a link to a PDF called. How do I structure my long answer in the exam?

25:09

Now I'd recommend strongly that you click on that

25:13

I'm not going to do so because I always then it's difficult for me to get back to the Moodle page, but

25:18

What I want to say about this PDF, well firstly it's very short

25:24

It's there because I'm aware that you guys have probably not written

25:30

This kind of answer for a few years now

25:34

You may well have had to do it at school, but you're studying

25:37

Natural sciences and you're doing a master's degree. So you've probably gone some time without writing an essay of this kind

25:45

I don't mean that you have to follow this structure exactly

25:52

But I've put it there for those people who do feel a little insecure about doing something like this again

25:58

Because you haven't done it for a while

26:01

So it's helpful. You can't go wrong if you follow the structure that I've written there

26:07

But you don't have to follow it. If you're confident enough to think you know how to do this

26:13

You've got your own way of structuring an essay

26:15

then

26:16

By all means do that as well

26:19

But I would say there are a couple of things you do need to do

26:24

Well, firstly, you need to know what criteria I'm going to be marking on

26:31

The first one would be clarity

26:33

In other words, I do want to know what you're saying and I do want to know why you think what you think

26:41

So make it as clear as you can

26:44

Some people, not very many, but some people who work in the social sciences or the humanities

26:51

Believe that if they write in such a way that no one can understand them

26:55

This shows that they're very deep and everybody ought to just follow them

26:59

Of course, it's difficult following people when you don't know what they're saying

27:02

But there are people who do try to impress by writing in a way that is almost impossible to understand

27:08

Please don't do that. I won't be impressed and I won't give you a good mark if you do that

27:13

I want to know what you're saying

27:16

This doesn't mean that I want your English to be perfect. It just means I want to know what you're saying

27:21

And I must say generally I am able to when I get long answers from the master students

27:28

doing this program

27:32

One reason why people don't like being clear is because you make yourself a bit vulnerable

27:37

If it's obvious what you're saying, then I can latch on to that and criticize it

27:41

I would just say be brave. Nobody's gonna kill you because of what you write here and

27:47

If you can back it up well enough. I really don't mind what your opinion is. I'm not here to

27:54

to

27:55

Propagandize you in any particular direction. So

27:58

Work out what you think tell me why you think it and to just trust the process

28:05

Okay, that that's clarity. The second thing that I mark on is accuracy of information

28:10

Well, that's just that just means don't don't tell me stuff that isn't true

28:15

and

28:17

Obviously, you can't things that you get from the internet. You can't always be a hundred percent certain

28:24

But do it in in good faith

28:27

do as much as you can to

28:29

To ascertain that what you're showing me is in fact the true facts about whatever you're writing about

28:38

Sorry, I just need a sip of water there. I have been talking for a while and

28:43

You

28:44

Dario you have a question

28:46

Yes quickly on this point

28:49

So in this in this long answer, do we have to reference? No

28:55

Good question. No, it's not a it's not a published essay. I really don't need that at all

29:02

So don't concern yourselves with that. I know that I'm being a bit

29:05

What's the word a bit slack by not making requirements there, but you're doing a master's in natural sciences

29:12

You know the rules are quite different in the in the social sciences

29:17

Do I want you to learn the rules just for this module? No, that would be just a waste of time. So

29:22

if you are

29:24

directly quoting from somebody

29:27

Just tell me that you are in whatever way seems best to you

29:31

So so don't don't pass off someone else's exact words as your words

29:36

but I don't mind how you let me know just say

29:40

Such and such says and then tell me what they say or something like that. You don't need footnotes. You don't need references

29:47

Okay

29:49

The third point is persuasiveness

29:53

So I want to be convinced by you. That's why I say don't be lame

29:58

Try try to ask yourself as carefully as you can. Why do I have this opinion?

30:04

And then try and persuade me that I should have that opinion as well. I

30:07

Mean I don't I don't mean you go. I don't mean think of crazy opinions and then try and convince me of them

30:14

It'll be more interesting for you if you

30:17

Can actually work out what your genuine opinion on these things are unlike the debates where you just get told what opinion you must be

30:25

Pushing that's not the case for the long questions

30:29

Okay

30:31

A couple more comments about what a good essay is like

30:34

I said and I really meant it that you don't have to follow the the pattern exactly

30:39

But a good introduction always helps

30:42

And by that I mean tell me what you're trying to do in your answer

30:46

So start off really very directly saying something like in this

30:51

Essay, I'm in this answer. I will be arguing that globalization makes the world a better place

30:56

Something like that. Just just write that sentence and then go on to the next one

31:00

Something like that just just write that sentence and then go on to to show me why you think it's

31:06

Made the world a better place or a worse place whatever your point of view is, but a good introduction never hurts

31:13

If you make it clear from the start what you're trying to do

31:17

Then that looks good

31:20

Also, I would say with a good conclusion does the same thing

31:24

A conclusion really is looking back to what you've written and telling me

31:28

What you think you have succeeded in doing

31:31

Again, one sentence or two. You don't need too much there

31:36

But just finish it off

31:38

Giving me the feeling. Okay. I know what this person's trying to do in this in this paper

31:44

sometimes you can get a bit lost in the middle and it gets a bit confusing but

31:49

If you can sum it up nicely in the conclusion

31:52

Then the person marking the essay often forgets that it was a bit confusing in the middle

31:56

And then you know i'm reading it and then I think

31:59

Ah, okay. So this is so this is what this is what they're trying to do and then I think okay

32:03

Well, that's not bad

32:05

So a good start and a good end are always good things

32:10

Another thing that I would say is important even if you don't follow the pattern exactly

32:16

Don't just write a rant in which

32:19

Um

32:20

Your point of view is obviously straight from god's mouth and anybody who disagrees with you is either a fool or or an evil person

32:29

Okay, very few people do this, but I do get it occasionally. Well master students generally don't

32:34

But just a warning

32:36

It always looks good if you understand your enemy so to speak

32:41

If you can tell me

32:43

Yeah, people will disagree with me and they'll say this

32:47

So, you know what they'll say against you

32:49

And then you can tell me

32:51

Why I should not believe what they're saying against you

32:54

Obviously, there's a time constraint here as well

32:57

Um, you don't have hours and hours. So you need to be quick about that

33:03

But putting something like that in also looks good it just shows that um

33:08

You're aware. You're not you you're not of the um, you're not living in a bubble

33:12

You don't think that only people like you are intelligent and decent people

33:16

Um

33:17

You believe your point of view

33:19

Uh, but you're aware what can be said against it and you'll tell me why

33:23

I should still believe your point of view that looks good as well

33:28

All right, um

33:30

My voice needs a short break. So I want to move on to tell you about the other half of the exam

33:35

in a moment, but uh

33:36

If anyone's got some questions, i'd be happy to take one now

33:47

No

33:48

So I have to carry on talking I suppose

33:50

All right

33:51

Um, I won't keep you for very much longer. Um

33:54

Because all i'm trying to do now is give you a sense of what's required in this course

33:59

And so perhaps I should also tell you what i'm going to be doing on the remaining four friday afternoons that I will talk to you

34:06

guys

34:07

um, please note that I did

34:11

Uh, I think it was a monday

34:13

Or could have been on the weekend

34:15

I changed the dates of the four of the five fridays

34:19

I didn't make a big change. All I did was switch the last friday meeting from the 10th

34:26

Of may to the to the 17th of may

34:31

So I will be seeing you again next

34:34

Friday the friday after that the friday after that and then we'll skip a friday. We'll skip the 10th

34:41

And then i'll see you again on the 17th. The reason is simple. It's simply that um

34:46

Uh the thursday just before the 10th in other words the 9th is a public holiday, so

34:52

People sometimes some people use that as a long weekend

34:55

And I don't want to stop you from doing that

34:58

um

34:59

And I might want to use it as a long weekend myself, of course

35:03

Okay, so I will do four more of these friday sessions

35:07

Um, but please I really want to emphasize this. Um

35:12

It once i've stopped doing them on the 17th, there's still almost three weeks till the exam that does not mean by

35:20

By any means that you can no longer contact me

35:24

um

35:25

I mean it quite seriously when I say that I like discussing the long questions and the exam

35:31

And even the debates if you want to do so with me

35:34

um, so

35:36

Setting up team sessions for me with me is no problem

35:40

I am in the next

35:43

Two or three weeks still quite busy with bachelor teaching, but but a lot of it drops off

35:48

After that and you'll find that it won't be too difficult

35:52

Getting a time slot to talk to me

35:55

um

35:56

Okay. So what am I going to do in these four friday sessions?

35:59

Well, what i'm going to do is prepare you for the short question section of the exam

36:06

So the exam is divided into two halves in terms of time

36:10

um

36:11

when obviously you have to manage that yourself, but

36:14

I will try to make it such that that it will take about half of the exam to answer the short questions

36:20

and then

36:21

The remaining half you can use to write your long answer

36:25

so the short questions

36:27

They are there to test whether you have understood two texts and let me show you what I mean

36:35

Where so if you go to the moodle section

36:39

where it says

36:40

pre-course reading and listening

36:43

There is quite a long list of texts there

36:47

um

36:48

The important ones are the two word files

36:52

Called this will be easy for you to remember

36:55

policy for science and science for policy

36:59

Those are two word documents

37:02

They're taken from a very good book on the relation between science and and ethics and politics

37:10

written by two academics adam briggle and carl mitchum

37:14

And this is exactly the kind of thing. I think that

37:18

Master's students ought to know about politics before going into the industry

37:24

So it's closely connected to the relationship between science and politics

37:28

You'll also notice that there are explanatory powerpoint slides on both of those texts

37:35

That you can click on and I will be

37:38

In general talking you through those powerpoint slides

37:43

And the texts to a lesser extent on the next four Fridays

37:48

so the first two that would be the 19th of april and the 26th of april would be devoted to the

37:54

text entitled policy for science

37:57

And the powerpoint slides which go with it

37:59

And then the two sessions that we'll have in may I will talk about the text called science for policy

38:06

You'll notice also that the explanatory powerpoint slides have voice notes on them, too

38:12

So i'm doing all I can to um to get the information across to you

38:17

But i'm not going to lie to you. These are not very easy texts to read and they're not that short either

38:24

uh, they're aimed at

38:26

American bachelor students, but they're aimed at american

38:30

Bachelor students who are doing political science and also who are mother tongue english speakers

38:36

So, um, I would say it's probably fair enough to expect you to understand them

38:41

but um

38:43

I don't think they're particularly easy texts. There's a lot of detail in there

38:47

and so I would strongly suggest you you try to

38:50

Get a program going now when you read say one page of the document per day

38:55

And then get in touch if there's anything in it that you don't understand

38:59

Um, but as I say, I will be talking you through these texts

39:03

On the fridays that follow the 19th and 26th of april

39:07

And the 3rd and the 17th of may

39:10

Um, I should also say I have put up a previous exam paper on the course moodle page. Um,

39:17

Um, where was it? It's uh, yeah, you'll see it it's in the

39:22

um

39:24

assessment and exam examination section again

39:27

Uh, you can see it now. It says example of a previous exam paper

39:31

Just be careful when you look at that

39:33

That was before um, I put long questions into the exams. So in other words, that was two semesters ago

39:40

um

39:42

But it'll still be very helpful to you because you'll get a good idea of what kind of short questions I ask

39:48

You'll notice that i'm not trying to trick you. I'm not trying to test whether you've read some really obscure part of the text

39:56

I'm trying to test whether you understand the big the big picture

40:01

um, but I do admit that um,

40:05

Uh working out what the big picture is may not be that easy for you

40:10

so, um

40:12

So I will be as I said on Fridays talking you through this

40:17

as thoroughly as I can and obviously

40:20

uh at any stage any day of the week you can get in touch with me and set up a team's meeting and say

40:27

I've been reading the text and I actually don't know what's going on here or I've been reading this in the text

40:31

And I don't know whether this is important or not

40:34

You're very welcome to ask me questions like that. As I say, we actually have two months from now until the exam

40:40

so, um

40:42

although

40:43

uh, this is a little more mentally stressful than me simply giving you lectures every week and then you know what the material is

40:51

I will try to uh

40:53

my Friday sessions

40:55

Will be at least something like lectures. Um,

40:58

And I'm also on standby to help you prepare the long

41:03

Exam question and also to understand these texts, uh as best you can

41:09

um

41:10

Okay, I'm trying to think whether there's anything else I actually want to say

41:14

um

41:15

I don't like keeping students any longer than I have to I also

41:20

Just because of my own voice don't like talking for hours and hours

41:24

But I'm happy to I'm happy to stick around now

41:28

And take any questions that uh that you may have

41:31

uh, but I would say that um

41:33

I'm, pretty sure let me just stop for a second looking at my notes here. I think I've covered everything but let me um

41:41

Let me just uh

41:43

Think for a moment. Could there be anything else I need to tell you?

41:50

Um, I suppose just a mark a remark about the exam

41:53

There were a couple of failures at the end of last semester. Um

41:58

And there were some people who got not very good marks

42:01

And I can say with 100 certainty that these were people who just didn't take the text seriously

42:06

um, so

42:07

uh

42:09

You know if you put the work in you'll pass I don't think there's any doubt about that

42:12

Uh, and also you'll find um

42:15

It's mostly quite enjoyable work

42:17

Uh, the texts as I said are quite long and quite difficult, but once you get into them, you'll find them pretty interesting

42:23

um, they may be it may be stuff you have thought about but it may be stuff that you hadn't thought about and

42:29

As I expect most of you are going into science in some way or other. Um,

42:34

And I'm guessing many of you

42:36

Also have some interest in politics. Otherwise, you wouldn't be doing this module

42:40

Um

42:42

I would uh, I think you're likely to find it's uh worth reading

42:47

Okay, I think that really is everything I wanted to say. Um

42:52

I'm going to stop sharing now

42:55

I'm not going to stop recording though because it may be that people have questions that are of general

43:01

interest

43:02

so

43:04

If you've had enough if you've got other things to do

43:06

Uh, if you feel you understand what's going on you're welcome to leave okay, so I see a question there already

43:12

Uh, the exam is a is a closed book exam. It's a closed book exam. You need to be aware of that

43:19

so, um

43:20

You will not be able to bring material into the exam

43:22

Uh, and so, uh, you need to be sure that you understand what's going on

43:31

Dominic, uh, that was a response to your question. Um

43:38

Any further questions?

43:49

local teaching

43:51

Yes

43:53

Yes

43:54

I heard that

43:56

uh

43:57

The first local teaching is split into two. Is this correct?

44:03

Because I couldn't attend the first time

44:07

Okay

44:08

So I I think you've been allocated to a group michael. In fact, I know you have

44:12

Yes

44:15

Uh, i've put you in a uh team's um

44:19

Workspace as well. Yes. I saw that

44:23

Already so I will ask there

44:26

for further information

44:28

Okay, but uh, if you've been here this afternoon, you will have heard almost everything I said

44:33

to them

44:35

Um, but I haven't spoken about the the the decentralized presentations and the local teaching I haven't

44:42

So i'll tell you what ask the team. Um, but if there are things that you're unsure of then just get back to me michael

44:48

Okay, I will

44:50

Thanks. All right

44:53

Um, i'm gonna have to find somewhere where I can leave this recording

44:57

I can't just leave it on this team's page because people from the ZRV don't have access to that

45:02

We had this problem last semester, but I did find a solution

45:05

I can't remember exactly what it was, but I will find it again and then I will let you know

45:09

How you can get access to the recording of the session

45:18

I have also a question for the presentation

45:21

Hi, Nadja. That is Nadja, is it? Yes

45:24

so, um

45:25

We saw in the team

45:28

that you created that

45:30

A wrong daniel is in the team

45:32

Ah, okay

45:34

and also one member of my group is from the

45:39

um

45:40

from burn so

45:42

There were some problems with accessing

45:46

The files we shared there

45:48

so

45:49

I think now we

45:51

Try to add the right daniel and the one from burn

45:55

But maybe you can just check that it's correct and maybe remove the other daniel

46:00

Because it's confusing. Can you just tell me who is the wrong daniel?

46:05

So there's a daniel fisher. It's the wrong one and daniel fisher one is the right one

46:11

Ah, these are two different people. Yes

46:14

Uh, okay

46:16

Daniel fisher one is the right one. Okay. Yes

46:18

I I think I did do that because marzia got hold of me about this problem earlier today nadja

46:23

Oh, okay

46:24

But I also noticed that when I tried to add the burn guy

46:28

Uh, it told me that it wouldn't show up for a while

46:31

So I need to go back and check whether it has showed up

46:35

For him. Okay, perfect. Um, but thanks for alerting me to that

46:39

uh

46:40

yeah, it's

46:41

it's crazy that

46:43

There's a cooperation master. Everybody knows this but still the uh, ms teams at the fiv creates problems for people from other

46:51

from other schools

46:53

anyway

46:54

Okay, so I think I'll sort that out. Nadia

47:03

any other questions

47:05

ah

47:05

um david, uh

47:07

Would you recommend?

47:09

Taking first the long questions or short questions. Ah interesting question

47:13

David I really don't know the answer to that. I mean, it's really up to you

47:17

I do start the exam with the short questions. So maybe it's just natural to do that. Um

47:24

but

47:25

But with the long question, maybe you're a bit stressed about are you going to remember everything?

47:32

So it might not be a bad idea to to start with a long question because then uh, you don't have to worry about

47:39

Will I can I keep this plan in my head? Um, but it really is up to you

47:45

uh

47:46

My impression will say you see with the last exam. I can't tell which one people did

47:52

Because the way the exam set out I will always see the short questions first, but that doesn't mean that they actually wrote them first

47:58

um

48:00

What would I do?

48:02

I think I might write the long question first

48:06

Because it's the more stressful

48:09

on the other hand

48:11

If you write the short questions first and you and you're feeling confident and you're getting the answers, right?

48:16

Then you know you get into a positive frame of mind and and that that can be good as well

48:25

Uh, Dario, did you have another question?

48:28

Uh, yes, it's more general about group membership because I was also not able to attend this week

48:33

But I think I just contact my coach. I guess that's the right

48:36

Yes thing to do. That's right. You're at the TETA-RV I assume. Yes

48:40

I mean, I would actually prefer to be at FRMW because it would just be closer to work

48:45

But I think that's not possible, right? I can't switch schools

48:49

I think you've left it too late Dario. Okay. Okay. Okay, that's fine

48:53

Also, I can say I mean this in all honesty the coaches at the TETA-RV are good

48:58

No, it's just in Valencia and I work in Basel. So

49:02

And I have to go to work after after the lecture. So just save some money and time

49:08

Right, but it's fine. It's fine. Okay

49:18

anything else

49:25

Okay. Well, it looks like uh, we've uh come to an end of the discussion

49:30

so

49:31

I'm going to uh close this and then I will make sure that

49:36

FRMW students you will simply be able to access the recording on Teams

49:41

but um

49:42

TETA-RV students I will make sure you have a way of accessing it as well

49:46

There definitely is a way of doing that. Um, so don't worry about it. I'll let you know

49:53

Michel? Yes

49:59

You have a question?

50:02

No, sorry, I just re-entered

50:04

All right, no worries. All right, then I'm going to say goodbye

50:07

And please do get in touch with me if you have any questions about any of this stuff

50:12

And obviously you'll be able to hear the recording as well

50:16

All right. Have a good weekend

50:19

Thank you. Bye. Thank you

50:21

Bye. Bye. Thank you. Have a nice weekend